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Pedro Ciriaco Called Up

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Port Charlotte, FL, USA; Boston Red Sox shorts stop Pedro Ciriaco (77) doubles in the first inning against the Tampa Bay Rays during their spring training game at Charlotte Sports Park. Mandatory Credit: Kim Klement-US PRESSWIRE
Port Charlotte, FL, USA; Boston Red Sox shorts stop Pedro Ciriaco (77) doubles in the first inning against the Tampa Bay Rays during their spring training game at Charlotte Sports Park. Mandatory Credit: Kim Klement-US PRESSWIRE

Infielder Pedro Ciriaco, who dazzled with his glove in spring training but has spent the season in Triple-A Pawtucket, has been called up to replace Dustin Pedroia on the 25-man roster, as Boston's starting second baseman is on the disabled list with a thumb injury.

Ciriaco, the third of four of Pawtucket's International League All-Stars to be called up to the Sox, can line up just about anywhere, but has spent most of his 2012 campaign at shortstop and second. His arrival gives Boston plenty of options in the infield, as Nick Punto can also shuffle around quite a bit, and Brent Lillibridge can slot in anywhere on the diamond save catcher. Mike Aviles is likely to stick at shortstop full-time, but he's also an option to move around if necessary.

To make room for Ciriaco on the 40-man roster, the Red Sox could transfer left-handed relief pitcher Rich Hill from the 15-day to the 60-day disabled list. Hill, who has been on the DL since June 9 with a forearm strain, likely wasn't due back until possibly August, anyway. With Boston's loaded bullpen -- one that will have even less room in it once Andrew Bailey returns -- this is a move that, while disappointing in that it would mean less Rich Hill, makes the most sense for the Red Sox right now.

As Scott Podsednik's rehab assignment is over, and no trade has been worked out just yet, this isn't likely to be the lone roster move of the day. That has an easy solution as well, though, since the scuffling Ryan Kalish can be optioned back to Pawtucket without invoking the need for any 40-man shenanigans.